The cockpit is the section of an aircraft that provides visibility to the front and sides while housing the pilots and other crew members. The cockpit also contains the display, control, and communications equipment that crew members need to operate and navigate the aircraft on the ground or in the air, talk to ground facilities or other aircraft, and monitor or control onboard systems and equipment such as engines, fuel tanks, air conditioning, and so on. In this blog, we will discuss cockpits in detail.


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A common debate when selecting an aircraft is the choice between a turboprop or jet engine. Jet engines are more common in private aviation, but turboprops are slowly increasing in popularity. In this blog, we will look at the advantages and disadvantages of both turboprop and jet engines.


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A Zener diode is a type of diode designed to allow current to flow backwards once a certain voltage, known as the Zener voltage, has been exceeded. Zener diodes are used throughout electronic equipment of all types and are considered a basic building block of electronic circuits. Due to their ability to reverse a portion of a current, Zener diodes offer many advantages over traditional diodes.


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Despite not being essential for flight, landing gear is among the most critical components of any aircraft. In fact, landing gear makes up approximately 7% of an aircraft’s weight as well as 20% of its maintenance costs. The largest manufacturer of aircraft landing gear is Safran Landing Systems, who operate worldwide. The process of producing landing gear components involves precise engineering of high-quality materials. For example, the strut, considered the heart of the landing gear, is machined out of a solid column of high strength steel. In this blog, we will discuss the main functions of aircraft landing gear.


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The aircraft piston engine serves as one of the most important aircraft engine types of the 20th century, powering countless early aircraft as we first reached the skies. Currently, a number of aircraft models still utilize piston parts for achieving propulsion, serving for training, business travel, and more. In this blog, we will provide a brief overview of the main types of aircraft piston engines, allowing you to better understand each.


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Solenoid valves are revolutionary components, allowing for valves to be remotely controlled. The solenoid valve assembly is electrically operated, containing a solenoid electromagnet and a valve body that contains two or more openings. The solenoid of the device contains a coil, sleeve, plunger, and sealing materials.


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Aircraft tires, unlike the typical car tires, need to withstand an incredibly wide scope of temperatures that go from short 60 degrees Celsius at an elevation of 10,000 meters to very high temperatures when arriving on the ground. It is also important that airplane tires are treated with much more care than your ordinary vehicle tires. Airplane tires are tubeless, have a weight of approximately 12 to 18 bar, and are loaded up with nitrogen rather than simply air. At the point when every one of these factors are assembled, the outcome is that airplane tires should be changed after each 120 to 400 landings depending upon the airplane model and factors (for example, the runway, the climate, and the pilot).


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There are some valid proponents and points made on the case for public and commercial aircraft travel. Some experts say that it is “better” for the environment or that it “produces less carbon emission” than if people were to use private air travel. Some yet claim that it is “elitist.” And while there may or may not be a semblance of reason to those points, here are some counterpoints that may well sway the opinion of the general public. In the case of public vs. private travel, there are many pros and many benefits that outweigh the few concerns and reservations that argue against it. Read on below for more information on private air travels and the different types of private air travel that are available.


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Typical aircraft achieve flight with the use of an internal combustion engine that ignites air and fuel mixtures, generating propulsion and thrust. This process generates intense amounts of heat within the engine area, and the aircraft engine cooling system ensures that temperature can be kept at a level that protects components and maintains efficient operation of systems. The cooling system may be based on air or liquid cooling, or may be a combination of the two. Each also has their various advantages and disadvantages, and understanding these can make an investment decision easier.


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Aircraft engines are an indispensable part of an aircraft, creating the ability for heavier-than-air flight for many planes, both small and large. They most often come in the form of piston engines and gas turbines, though some may be electric. In both piston engines and gas turbines, propulsion for flight is achieved through the combustion of fuel, and then the various engine parts work together to generate mechanical power. While aircraft engines are very advanced and well developed, they still face problems just like any other machine and are prone to failures over time with constant use. When these instances happen, it can pose issues affecting time and money to get them back up and running. While one could simply replace an engine, there are various benefits to having an engine rebuilt instead. In this blog, we will discuss some of the common reasons that engines fail, as well as the benefits of rebuilding them instead of replacing them.


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When conducting inspections and maintenance of an aircraft, there are often two categories it can fall into. The first category is scheduled maintenance which is conducted annually, before flights, on timed intervals, or any other pre-scheduled time by the pilot and/or technician. The other type is unscheduled maintenance and is conducted whenever a problem arises and needs to be checked and solved. Understanding the two is very important for pilots for safe flight and preservation of their equipment.


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When owning or flying an aircraft, safety should be the greatest concern and responsibility. One major way to adhere to safety is to ensure that your aircraft engine is regularly overhauled at a facility. Time Between Overhauls (TBO) is a set amount of time, usually determined by the manufacturer, that is the recommended amount of operating hours before an engine requires an overhaul. Aircraft in use face normal wear and tear, and those that fly in extreme conditions are faced with much more, all affecting the performance and operation of the engine and its components.


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The primary goal of flight is not only to get from point A to point B, but to get there safely and comfortably. When you’re 35,000 feet above the ground, you shouldn’t be sweating over your aircraft’s reliability. The best way to keep your mind at ease is through regular aircraft maintenance. Rather than wait until you have a problem to address it, preempting any potential issues is the responsible, safe, and cost-effective thing to do.


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The decision to overhaul an engine is one of the most difficult choices an aircraft owner has to make. This tough decision is made even more difficult when the aircraft is running properly and passing inspections during an aircraft’s time between time-based overhauls (TBO). However, each of the many moving parts within an aircraft wears out and eventually needs repair or replacement. Safety is the most important goal in aviation. That principle, when applied to machinery or mechanical devices, is reliability. Here are a few factors you should take into consideration when making a decision about engine overhaul.


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In the aviation industry, “AOG” is a term that gives pilots and maintenance crews headaches just hearing those three letters together. AOG stands for aircraft on ground, a situation in aviation maintenance in which an aircraft has a mechanical issue serious enough to prevent it from flying. This can be due to flat-out mechanical impossibility (the engines cannot start, for instance) or because the safety hazard is too great (the aircraft’s navigation systems are not functioning properly). AOG is technically defined as any discrepancy that grounds an aircraft and is reported within six hours of a normally scheduled departures.


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When writing about aircraft designs, much is made about the wings and engines. After all, these are the components that provide lift and thrust, the two forces that help the aircraft achieve and maintain flight. But on larger commercial aircraft, such as the Boeing 747, the aircraft’s engines are mounted on the wing. What then, is the part that connects the engine to the wing?


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It is a given that commercial airlines make their money through ticket sales from vacationers, those who travel for business, and those who just need to get point A to point B quickly. There is, however, another revenue opportunity that, in the past, has been overlooked by major airlines. Before a plane can fly and generate revenue, it must be certified as safe. The FAA calls for strict maintenance plans that include the disassembly and reassembly of aircraft. The 100-hour inspection is an example of a maintenance requirement that is extensive therefore requiring numerous hours and copious space. Since the 1990s, airlines have outsourced these maintenance procedures to Maintenance, Repair, and Overhaul (MRO) facilities that are located off-site and away from the airport.


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When your plane arrives at its destination and slowly moves towards the terminal, you may have noticed several different pieces of equipment waiting to service the plane. Tow tractors, cranes, dollies, and ground support personnel busying about, waiting to perform crucial maintenance on the plane you just exited. This ground support is the lifeline for successful flights.


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Various types of turbine engines are used on aircraft today. Generally, air enters an inlet, is compressed, burnt, and the resulting exhaust gases are used to produce thrust either directly or to power propellers. In order for the combustor to work efficiently, it requires high- pressure air to mix with the fuel. The compressor provides the optimal air pressure for the combustion chamber. There are two main types of compressors: centrifugal flow and axial flow.  


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Engine failure has dire consequences. When you’re driving your car and you experience engine failure, you face being stranded on the side of the road and paying hundreds, if not thousands, for a tow and a solution. On the other hand, when you’re flying and you experience engine failure, you face the very real threat of falling out of the sky. With that in mind, it makes sense that aircraft engine overhauls are serious business.


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